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Buy Gold Coins

Gold is up over 300% in the last few years and rising fast.

Of all the precious metals, gold is the most popular as an investment. Investors generally buy gold as a hedge or safe haven against any economic, political, social, or fiat currency crises (including investment market declines, burgeoning national debt, currency failure, inflation, war and social unrest).

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Buy Gold
Of all the precious metals, gold is the most popular as an investment. Investors generally buy gold as a hedge or safe haven against any economic, political, social, or fiat currency crises (including investment market declines, burgeoning national debt, currency failure, inflation, war and social unrest).

Throughout the last 6,000 years, gold has been the foundation for almost every economy, every government, and every empire. But in the last century, governments have started printing paper money that isn't backed by gold, silver, or any other precious metal.

This has led to the world being flooded with more and more "paper" money. Inflation is becoming more and more inevitable. Debt is exploding for governments around the planet. People are losing faith in paper money, their governments, and the economy in general. But some of the smart investors are turning to the age-old investment - gold.
Gold is up over 300% in the last few years and rising fast.
For anyone who wants to hold the "real thing," gold coins and gold bullion is the way to go. It can be found in bar or coin form. Bullion is a recognized fineness and weight of gold that can be purchased for the current gold price plus a small percentage to refine, fabricate, and ship the item. Two things that need to be considered when purchasing gold bullion are storage and insurance, which add to the holding costs.

Investors buy gold coins when they want to hold physical gold but do not want to deal with storage issues presented by gold bullion bars. Coins are available with varying gold contents and can be stored in a home safe or a bank safety deposit box.

Gold mutual funds, gold bullion, and gold coins represent the three best ways to buy gold. Prices of each are rising every day so do not hesitate when considering a purchase. Do some research to find the best investments for the money and add some of the golden precious metal to the portfolio for safety and a store of value.

For centuries, buying gold has been recognized as one of the best ways to preserve one's wealth and purchasing power. Gold is a unique investment, one that has served mankind well for thousands of years. From the times of ancient Egyptians, Greeks and Romans to more modern times, man has been fascinated with the beauty and magic of gold, and with its power to change people's lives. Gold is the best form of money the world has ever known. Gold is a store of value and a safe haven in times of crisis. Gold is rare, universally accepted, and can be easily bought and sold around the world. It is used in coinage and is a standard for monetary systems in many countries. Gold, like other precious metals, is measured in troy weight; when alloyed with other metals, the term carat is used to express the amount of gold present, 24 carats being pure gold.
Gold Bullion Coins
Bullion Coins are similar to Bullion Bars in that they are precious metals and are not usually valued as money but as their purity and mass. Bullion Coins' value as legal tender isn't anywhere near as high as the value of the coins in reality. For example, the Canadian Maple Coin (Gold Maple Leaf) which is a Gold Bullion Coin is used as legal tender at $50, whereas its actual value as a Bullion Coin is well over $700.

As you can see from this example, investing in Bullion Coins is definitely worth while. If you already invest in ISA's and stocks and shares then why not spread your money by investing in Bullion Coins?
Gold Bullion Bars
When you buy Universal Coin and Collectables Gold Bullion bars, you're buying gold bullion bars whose weight, content and purity are guaranteed by the U.S. government. This makes them not only recognized as America's official investment-grade gold bullion, but accepted worldwide in major investment markets.

When looking for an investment with stability, consider Universal Coin and Collectables. They consistently hold their value, no matter how volatile the financial climate, because their value often moves independently of stocks and bonds. Many experts recommend diversifying by adding gold to your investment portfolio as a way of improving overall performance.

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$1 Gold Type 1 Liberty Head (1849 - 1854)
The $1 gold coin, first issued in 1849, is one of the smallest coins in United States History. About the size of today's dime, these 90% gold coins were approved by a Congress looking to expand the use of gold in our currency to capitalize on several gold rushes in the preceding decades. Minted from 1849 - 1889, the dollar gold coins were redesigned three times, and are commonly referred to as the Type 1 Liberty Head (1849 - 1853), Type 2 Small Indian Head (1854 - 1856), and the Type 3 Large Indian Head (1856 - 1889).

Designed James Longacre, chief engraver for the US Mint, the $1 Gold Type 1 Liberty Head (1849 - 1854) gold dollar coin features a Liberty Head surrounded by thirteen stars on the obverse, and a wreath on the reverse. Minted in Philadelphia, Dahlonega, Charlotte, New Orleans, and San Francisco, the new Type 1 gold dollar gold coins had a diameter of only 13mm - the smallest coin in United States history. Due to its small size and large value, the public criticized the coin, claiming that it was easily lost. Subsequently, over two-thirds had been melted down in order to mint other gold coins, and the rarest is the 1849-C.
$1 Gold Type II Small Indian Head (1854 - 1856)
The $1 gold coin, first issued in 1849, is one of the smallest coins in United States History. About the size of today's dime, these 90% gold coins were approved by a Congress looking to expand the use of gold in our currency to capitalize on several gold rushes in the preceding decades. Minted from 1849 - 1889, the dollar gold coins were redesigned three times, and are commonly referred to as the Type 1 Liberty Head (1849 - 1853), Type 2 Small Indian Head (1854 - 1856), and the Type 3 Large Indian Head (1856 - 1889).

Responding to the public's objection to small size of the Type 1 gold dollar coin, the United States Mint redesigned the coin as the $1 Gold Type 2 Small Indian Head (1854 - 1856). In order to keep the metal composition and value of gold in the dollar consistent, the Type 2 coin was made thinner so the diameter could be increased from 13 to 15 mm. However, the new gold coin was not without problems. Due to the high relief, few coins were properly struck. Unfit for circulation, the Type 2 gold dollar coins are considered to be very rare. Collectors looking to buy gold coins are therefore particularly attracted to this series. Demand for the Type 2 gold dollar has traditionally been strong and it is considered the key coin in the popular 12-Coin U.S. Gold Set. The 1855 Dahlonega is the rarest with a mintage of only 1,811 coins.
$1 Gold Type 3 Large Indian Head (1856 - 1889)
The $1 gold coin, first issued in 1849, is one of the smallest coins in United States History. About the size of today's dime, these 90% gold coins were approved by a Congress looking to expand the use of gold in our currency to capitalize on several gold rushes in the preceding decades. Minted from 1849 - 1889, the dollar gold coins were redesigned three times, and are commonly referred to as the Type 1 Liberty Head (1849 - 1853), Type 2 Small Indian Head (1854 - 1856), and the Type 3 Large Indian Head (1856 - 1889).

Correcting some of the minting issues with the Type 2 gold dollar, the $1 Gold Type 3 Large Indian Head (1856 - 1889) gold coin featured several design revisions by Longacre, such as an enlarged and flattened portrait of Miss Liberty, who, as in the Type 2, is still represented as an Indian Princess. This new $1 gold coin was easier to strike and was minted until the gold dollar was discontinued in 1889, and gold dollars continued to circulate in some areas until the country abandoned the gold standard in the early 1930s. Many dates are rare, the rarest being the 1861 D and 1875 P.
$2.5 Liberty Eagle
Modeled after the Coronet-type Large Cent (1816-1857), Christian Gobrecht's Liberty Quarter Eagle $2.50 gold coin was introduced in 1840 and the design continued unchanged for 33 years, longer than any other design in the history of American gold coins. The obverse contains a bust of the crowned image of Miss Liberty, and the reverse features an American bald eagle with an olive branch and arrows in its talons, thus continuing the Mint's long tradition of uniformity among the nation's coins.
$2.5 Indian Eagle
President Theodore Roosevelt, eager to beautify American coinage in a manner that reflected our proud national heritage, commissioned sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens to redesign all American coinage. However, Saint-Gaudens died of cancer after completing design work for the $10 (Eagle) and $20 (Double Eagle) gold coins, but before he was able to complete his commission. A student of Saint-Gaudens, Bela Lyon Pratt, was therefore commissioned to redesign the $2.50 and $5.00 denomination gold coins. Pratt surprised the numismatic community when he introduced the two gold coins with a unique incuse design, inspired from a museum exhibit on Egyptian coins. This means that instead of a raised image, the image on the incuse coin is sunk below the surface. As an attempt to combat counterfeiting, the $2.50 Indian Head and $5 Indian Head were the only U.S. coins produced in this manner. It was such a drastic departure from the norm, that these two gold coins faced strong opposition in the beginning. Some said the recessed design would harbor germs and spread illness! Thus the public was understandably reluctant to preserve even uncirculated specimens. Furthermore, because Pratt did not choose to use rims to protect the surface of the coin, uncirculated examples are scarce and superb gems are virtually unheard of.

On the $2.5 Indian Quarter Eagle, as with the $5 Indian Half Eagle, the obverse features a Native American in full headdress surrounded by thirteen stars representing the original colonies. On the reverse is an American eagle with an olive branch, a symbol of military preparedness and peace.

One reason the $2.50 Indian gold coin is such an attractive gold investment and collector's item is that this Quarter Eagle gold coin was minted during only 13 years, making it one of the shortest-lived series in U.S. Numismatics. Quarter Eagles of this type were produced in 1908 through 1915 and again from 1925 through 1929, after which time the denomination was suspended. Because of unusual history, interesting design, and sporadic minting, these coins are still in high demand.
$5 Liberty Half Eagle
The Liberty Head Half Eagle $5 gold coins shared a design with the new Eagles released the year before and the Quarter Eagles that would be minted the following year, thus continuing the Mint's long tradition of uniformity among the nation's coins. The obverse features a bust of Lady Liberty, hair knotted in back with hanging curls, wearing a coronet inscribed "Liberty". The reverse features an American eagle holding arrows and an olive branch in its talons with a shield across its breast.

For collectors assembling an example of each face value in the Liberty Gold Coin Series, the true challenge is finding the rare $5 Gold Liberty to complement the other pieces. During the Civil War, widespread gold hoarding led the U.S. government to significantly reduce the mintages of these coins, making issues from that era particularly rare. Thus, few collectors succeed due to the rarity and scarcity of this coin.

The $5 Liberty Half Eagle gold coin holds the distinction of being the only coin of any type or denomination to be struck at all seven mints. They were struck in two types--the ultra-scarce "No Motto," minted from 1839 until 1865 and the "With Motto" (IN GOD WE TRUST) type, struck from 1866 until 1908.
$5 Indian Half Eagle
President Theodore Roosevelt, eager to beautify American coinage in a manner that reflected our proud national heritage, commissioned sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens to redesign all American coinage. However, Saint-Gaudens died of cancer after completing design work for the $10 (Eagle) and $20 (Double Eagle) gold coins, but before he was able to complete his commission. A student of Saint-Gaudens, Bela Lyon Pratt, was therefore commissioned to redesign the $2.50 and $5.00 denominations gold coins. Pratt surprised the numismatic community when he introduced the two gold coins with a unique incuse design, inspired from a museum exhibit on Egyptian coins. This means that instead of a raised image, the image on the incuse coin is sunk below the surface. As an attempt to combat counterfeiting, the $2.50 Indian Head and $5 Indian Head were the only U.S. coins produced in this manner. It was such a drastic departure from the norm, that these two gold coins faced strong opposition in the beginning. Some said the recessed design would harbor germs and spread illness! Thus the public was understandably reluctant to preserve even uncirculated specimens. Furthermore, because Pratt did not choose to use rims to protect the surface of the coin, uncirculated examples are scarce and superb gems are virtually unheard of.

On the $5 Indian Quarter Eagle, as with the $2.5 Indian Half Eagle, the obverse features a Native American in full headdress surrounded by thirteen stars representing the original colonies. On the reverse is an American eagle with an olive branch, a symbol of military preparedness and peace.

The $5 Indian Head coin was first struck in 1908, the same year as the $2.50 Indian Head. It continued to be minted until 1916, when productions was stopped until it was minted again for a single year in 1929. Because of unusual history, interesting design, and sporadic minting, these coins are still in high demand. In fact, the $5 Half Eagle is what we refer to as a "stopper coin", since it's often difficult for collectors to find the year and condition they need to complete a set.
$10 Liberty Eagle
After an absence of thirty-four years, a new Liberty Eagle $10 gold coin was finally introduced in 1838. Earlier gold eagles had been hoarded or melted down when their gold composition was worth more than the face value.

Engraver Christian Gobrecht designed the coin that would come to be known as the Liberty Head Eagle. This gold coin features a bust of Lady Liberty on the obverse, and the reverse features a proud American eagle grasping arrows and an olive branch in its talons and a shield across its breast.

Because of its convenient size and denomination, the $10 Liberty was instantly popular and became one of the most circulated coins in U.S. history. They were hoarded during the Civil War, when it took $25 in paper "greenbacks" to buy just one $10 Liberty Eagle gold coin.
$10 Indian Eagle
The golden era of American coinage was a result of a 1907 collaboration between president Theodore Roosevelt and renown American sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens. The partnership gave us new designs for both the twenty dollar eagle gold coin and the ten dollar eagle gold coin.

The design of these coins is considered by many to be the finest American gold coin ever. Roosevelt, inspired by the artistic beauty and powerful symbolism of ancient Greek coinage, sought to introduce coinage that reflected America's emergence to power on a world stage. Saint-Gaudens used the image of Miss Liberty adorned by a full Indian war bonnet with star-tipped feathers, combining two traditional designs which caused quite a stir. The public got over their initial shock and quickly grew to appreciate the bold new design. Adding to the uniqueness of the coin is the edge. While most coins have a reeded edge, this gold coin features stars along the edge to represent each state in the union. Originally minted with just 46 stars, two more were added in 1912 when Arizona and New Mexico were granted statehood. The reverse features familiar American symbolism; an eagle perched upon an olive branch.

What makes these special is that they can be quite difficult to find, since minting was done intermittently from 1907 - 1933, and millions had been recalled and melted when the treasury ordered gold in private hands be confiscated. In fact, the total number of $10 Eagles minted was less than that in a single year of the Morgan silver dollars. This makes the $10 Indian Head gold coins very rare.