Title Here
text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text

text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text text
Interested In:
First Name:
Last Name:
Email Address:
Phone Number:
Live Silver Quote
Silver is in high demand. UCC Inc. offers live silver quotes hosted by 24hr Gold.
Live Gold Quote
Gold is up over 300% in the last few years and rising fast. UCC offers live gold quotes.
Our expert staff is ready to answer your questions
We will contact you via email or phone in the next 15 minutes
Get Started Today
Please fill out the short form below
$1 Gold Type 1 Liberty Head (1849 - 1854)
The $1 gold coin, first issued in 1849, is one of the smallest coins in United States History. About the size of today's dime, these 90% gold coins were approved by a Congress looking to expand the use of gold in our currency to capitalize on several gold rushes in the preceding decades. Minted from 1849 - 1889, the dollar gold coins were redesigned three times, and are commonly referred to as the Type 1 Liberty Head (1849 - 1853), Type 2 Small Indian Head (1854 - 1856), and the Type 3 Large Indian Head (1856 - 1889).

Designed James Longacre, chief engraver for the US Mint, the $1 Gold Type 1 Liberty Head (1849 - 1854) gold dollar coin features a Liberty Head surrounded by thirteen stars on the obverse, and a wreath on the reverse. Minted in Philadelphia, Dahlonega, Charlotte, New Orleans, and San Francisco, the new Type 1 gold dollar gold coins had a diameter of only 13mm - the smallest coin in United States history. Due to its small size and large value, the public criticized the coin, claiming that it was easily lost. Subsequently, over two-thirds had been melted down in order to mint other gold coins, and the rarest is the 1849-C.
Ben Franklin Half Dollars
The introduction of the solid silver Benjamin Franklin half dollar coins in 1948 completed the conversion of U.S. coin designs from symbolic figures to portraits of famous Americans. Of all the Founding Fathers, Franklin very likely enjoyed the greatest stature among his contemporaries, not only in this country but also abroad. He was renowned as a printer, publisher, author, inventor, scientist and diplomat, and he played a pivotal role in helping the colonies gain their independence by securing vital aid from France.

The Benjamin Franklin half dollar silver coins feature a portrait of the famous American on the obverse. The Liberty Bell on the reverse made sense as a complement to Franklin, since both have become closely identified not only with the nation's birth but also with the city of Philadelphia.

Benjamin Franklin half dollars were minted for just 16 years, and the mintages were modest by modern-day standards. A full set of silver Franklin halves consists of 35 business strikes and 14 proofs. Production of the series was cut short at the end of 1963, when John F. Kennedy's assassination led to the creation of a new half dollar memorializing the president.

Because it is so compact and easily affordable in less-than-pristine grades, the series is widely collected by date and mint. Those with deeper pockets who love a challenge seek to assemble date-and-mint sets in MS-65 and above or collections of high-grade proof Franklins with deep cameo contrast. Many dates are difficult to find at higher mint-state grades, especially those with fully defined "bell lines" near the Liberty Bell's bottom. Although the relatively low mintage 1949-D and 1950-D issues are considered "key" dates in the series, some coins with higher mintages, while common in lower grades, also command impressive premiums in Mint State-65 and above. These coins routinely came with weak strikes, and the scarcity of "gems" is compounded by the fact that few were carefully saved. Dates in this category include 1960-D, 1961-P and D and 1962-P and D. Premiums exist for colorful or attractively toned coins.

Composed of 90% solid silver, these Benjamin Franklin half dollar coins represent a great opportunity for both collectors and investors alike. If you're looking to buy silver, call UCCI today to get started and capitalize on this great opportunity!
$2.5 Liberty Eagle
Modeled after the Coronet-type Large Cent (1816-1857), Christian Gobrecht's Liberty Quarter Eagle $2.50 gold coin was introduced in 1840 and the design continued unchanged for 33 years, longer than any other design in the history of American gold coins. The obverse contains a bust of the crowned image of Miss Liberty, and the reverse features an American bald eagle with an olive branch and arrows in its talons, thus continuing the Mint's long tradition of uniformity among the nation's coins.
$2.5 Indian Eagle
President Theodore Roosevelt, eager to beautify American coinage in a manner that reflected our proud national heritage, commissioned sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens to redesign all American coinage. However, Saint-Gaudens died of cancer after completing design work for the $10 (Eagle) and $20 (Double Eagle) gold coins, but before he was able to complete his commission. A student of Saint-Gaudens, Bela Lyon Pratt, was therefore commissioned to redesign the $2.50 and $5.00 denomination gold coins. Pratt surprised the numismatic community when he introduced the two gold coins with a unique incuse design, inspired from a museum exhibit on Egyptian coins. This means that instead of a raised image, the image on the incuse coin is sunk below the surface. As an attempt to combat counterfeiting, the $2.50 Indian Head and $5 Indian Head were the only U.S. coins produced in this manner. It was such a drastic departure from the norm, that these two gold coins faced strong opposition in the beginning. Some said the recessed design would harbor germs and spread illness! Thus the public was understandably reluctant to preserve even uncirculated specimens. Furthermore, because Pratt did not choose to use rims to protect the surface of the coin, uncirculated examples are scarce and superb gems are virtually unheard of.

On the $2.5 Indian Quarter Eagle, as with the $5 Indian Half Eagle, the obverse features a Native American in full headdress surrounded by thirteen stars representing the original colonies. On the reverse is an American eagle with an olive branch, a symbol of military preparedness and peace.

One reason the $2.50 Indian gold coin is such an attractive gold investment and collector's item is that this Quarter Eagle gold coin was minted during only 13 years, making it one of the shortest-lived series in U.S. Numismatics. Quarter Eagles of this type were produced in 1908 through 1915 and again from 1925 through 1929, after which time the denomination was suspended. Because of unusual history, interesting design, and sporadic minting, these coins are still in high demand.
America the Beautiful - 2011
The 2011 America the Beautiful 5 ounce .999 fine silver bullion quarter dollars are here, and they're unlike anything you've seen before! This series of silver bullion coins features the same 56 designs as the circulating America the Beautiful quarters, but these silver coins are HUGE! Each of the five coins in this second year issue set contain 5 ounces of silver each. Continue your collection with the second year issue in a 12-year series. The 2011 Series features Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania, Glacier National Park, Montana, Olympic National Park, Washington, Vicksburg National Military Park, Mississippi, and Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Oklahoma.

The America the Beautiful 5 ounce silver bullion coins each have a composition of .999 fine silver, bullion weight of 5 ounces silver, and diameter of 3 inches. These massive silver coins are certified BU (Brilliant Uncirculated) by NGC, encapsulated in a sonically sealed protective acrylic case, and has a unique barcode and serial number.
$5 Liberty Half Eagle
The Liberty Head Half Eagle $5 gold coins shared a design with the new Eagles released the year before and the Quarter Eagles that would be minted the following year, thus continuing the Mint's long tradition of uniformity among the nation's coins. The obverse features a bust of Lady Liberty, hair knotted in back with hanging curls, wearing a coronet inscribed "Liberty". The reverse features an American eagle holding arrows and an olive branch in its talons with a shield across its breast.

For collectors assembling an example of each face value in the Liberty Gold Coin Series, the true challenge is finding the rare $5 Gold Liberty to complement the other pieces. During the Civil War, widespread gold hoarding led the U.S. government to significantly reduce the mintages of these coins, making issues from that era particularly rare. Thus, few collectors succeed due to the rarity and scarcity of this coin.

The $5 Liberty Half Eagle gold coin holds the distinction of being the only coin of any type or denomination to be struck at all seven mints. They were struck in two types--the ultra-scarce "No Motto," minted from 1839 until 1865 and the "With Motto" (IN GOD WE TRUST) type, struck from 1866 until 1908.
$5 Indian Half Eagle
President Theodore Roosevelt, eager to beautify American coinage in a manner that reflected our proud national heritage, commissioned sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens to redesign all American coinage. However, Saint-Gaudens died of cancer after completing design work for the $10 (Eagle) and $20 (Double Eagle) gold coins, but before he was able to complete his commission. A student of Saint-Gaudens, Bela Lyon Pratt, was therefore commissioned to redesign the $2.50 and $5.00 denominations gold coins. Pratt surprised the numismatic community when he introduced the two gold coins with a unique incuse design, inspired from a museum exhibit on Egyptian coins. This means that instead of a raised image, the image on the incuse coin is sunk below the surface. As an attempt to combat counterfeiting, the $2.50 Indian Head and $5 Indian Head were the only U.S. coins produced in this manner. It was such a drastic departure from the norm, that these two gold coins faced strong opposition in the beginning. Some said the recessed design would harbor germs and spread illness! Thus the public was understandably reluctant to preserve even uncirculated specimens. Furthermore, because Pratt did not choose to use rims to protect the surface of the coin, uncirculated examples are scarce and superb gems are virtually unheard of.

On the $5 Indian Quarter Eagle, as with the $2.5 Indian Half Eagle, the obverse features a Native American in full headdress surrounded by thirteen stars representing the original colonies. On the reverse is an American eagle with an olive branch, a symbol of military preparedness and peace.

The $5 Indian Head coin was first struck in 1908, the same year as the $2.50 Indian Head. It continued to be minted until 1916, when productions was stopped until it was minted again for a single year in 1929. Because of unusual history, interesting design, and sporadic minting, these coins are still in high demand. In fact, the $5 Half Eagle is what we refer to as a "stopper coin", since it's often difficult for collectors to find the year and condition they need to complete a set.
Morgan Silver Dollar
The Morgan Dollar is a United States issued silver dollar minted from 1878 through 1904. Due to special circumstances, the Morgan silver dollar was again minted in 1921.

After one of the largest silver finds in United States history, Congress passed a law requiring the Treasury to buy millions of ounces a month for the production of silver coins. Since the mint had ceased production of the Seated Liberty dollar in 1873, the incoming silver was used to make the new Morgan Dollar silver coins.

The coin is named for its designer, the British engraver George T. Morgan. The obverse of the silver dollar depicts a profile portrait representing Lady Liberty, while the reverse depicts an eagle, wings outstretched, with a clutch of arrows and an olive branch in its talons.

Morgan Dollars were minted from 1878 through 1904, and again in 1921, in Philadelphia (no mintmark), San Francisco ("S" mintmark), New Orleans ("O"), Carson City, Nevada ("CC"), and Denver ("D"). Each Morgan is composed of .900 fine silver.
$10 Liberty Eagle
After an absence of thirty-four years, a new Liberty Eagle $10 gold coin was finally introduced in 1838. Earlier gold eagles had been hoarded or melted down when their gold composition was worth more than the face value.

Engraver Christian Gobrecht designed the coin that would come to be known as the Liberty Head Eagle. This gold coin features a bust of Lady Liberty on the obverse, and the reverse features a proud American eagle grasping arrows and an olive branch in its talons and a shield across its breast.

Because of its convenient size and denomination, the $10 Liberty was instantly popular and became one of the most circulated coins in U.S. history. They were hoarded during the Civil War, when it took $25 in paper "greenbacks" to buy just one $10 Liberty Eagle gold coin.